Sussex: A solar farm in Ringmer covering 25 hectares of arable land. Following habitat surveys and protected species surveys plans were drawn up to convert the land below the solar panels into a grassland. With the aim of delivering Biodiversity Net Gain in accordance with the new Environment Act and the local planning authority. 

The design included grasses for seed production for farmland birds, including nesting Skylarks, with a wildflower mix for pollinators. Over 1.2km of new hedgerow planting will improve connectivity and provide new food and shelter for breeding birds. An existing 0.8 km of hedges will also be enhanced.

The site achieved over 200% Biodiversity Net Gain.

Mid Kent: Habitat Regulation Assessments and Ecological Impact Assessments provided on a number of large residential developments across Kent.  High populations of reptiles were recorded during surveys on one site. Recommendations to adjust the design of habitats to avoid and protect badger setts were provided. We provided biodiversity net gain assessments with sites achieving in excess of 10%. 

Habitat Regulation Assessments and Ecological Impact Assessments provided on a number of large residential developments across Kent.  High populations of reptiles were recorded during surveys on one site. Recommendations to adjust the design of habitats to avoid and protect badger setts were provided. We provided biodiversity net gain assessments with sites achieving in excess of 10%. 

Lydd:  Vegetation surveys on a site formed partly by Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay, including one of Europe’s largest expanse of vegetated shingle and an Annex 1 habitat making this a Special Area of Conservation.

North Kent: Multiple small scale sites with residential proposals on working farms. Bat surveys identified bat droppings and Daubenton’s bats present on one of the sites.  A species of bat specialised for feeding over water.

A mitigation and enhancement plan was designed to make habitats on site more beneficial to Daubenton’s, including underwater, emergent and bank planting to attract more insects for the bats.

Sittingbourne: An Ecological Assessment requiring pond surveys at a site near Sittingbourne, found large populations of great crested newts.

Hamstreet: A residential development in need of an Ecological Method Statement.  Our assistant ecologist saw her first ever dormouse, confirming their continued presence on site. The habitats on site will be enhanced, as part of a dormouse mitigation licence and a buffer incorporating high quality native habitat creation will be included around the ancient woodland.